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Posted by on Mar 16, 2017 in Uncategorized |

3 Causes Of Jawbone Resorption

If you recently visited your dentist to discuss dental implants, he may have told you that your jawbone has receded too much to support them and that bone grafting is necessary. Your body will reabsorb your jawbone for a number of reasons that many dental patients are not aware of. Here is an explanation of three common causes of jawbone reabsorption.

Lack of Stimulation

The dental socket consists of the soft tissues and bone that surround the roots of your teeth. The forces of chewing and clenching your teeth stimulate the tissues and the bone of the dental socket under normal circumstances. If this stimulation is lost, your body will begin to reabsorb the dental socket until an implant can no longer be supported.

While losing a tooth is the most common case where the bone and tissues of the dental socket begin to degrade, it can also be caused by the misalignment of the teeth. Teeth that are crooked may not place enough pressure on the teeth they would normally clench firmly against. Another common case where socket recession occurs is when traditional dentures or dental bridges are used; unlike dental implants, these prosthetics do not stimulate the socket(s) below them.

Infection

While bacteria in the mouth are well-known for causing cavities, you may not be aware that they can also damage the jawbone beneath your teeth. Plaque that is allowed to build up on the teeth will eventually become a hard substance called tartar. Tartar cannot be removed with normal brushing, as it normally develops between the teeth and the gums.

Tartar creates the perfect breeding ground for bacteria beneath your gums. As your body tries to fight the microorganisms in and around the roots of your teeth, the gums and dental sockets will become inflamed and begin to recede. If bacteria eat through your dental enamel, they can also spread through the nerve of your tooth into your jawbone, creating an abscess that degrades the jawbone over time.

Other Medical Conditions

You may be surprised to learn that some medical conditions that are not directly responsible for tooth decay can lead to jawbone reabsorption as well. Facial tumors that require radiation treatment can result in jawbone loss, as the radiation can damage the jawbone and cause your body to reabsorb parts of it. Another example is osteoporosis, a disease characterized by bone density loss, can cause jawbone degradation and reabsorption in much the same way as it damages the rest of the bones in your body.

If your dentist recommends dental implants, but you are suffering from jawbone reabsorption, ask your dentist if bone grafting could provide the solid foundation that you need for implants to restore your natural smile. To find out more, contact someone like All About Smiles