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Posted by on May 9, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Dental Implants – When Is An Abutment Not Added?

If you have discussed full dental restoration with your dental professional, then you may have learned about a few options that are available to you. One of these options includes the placement of one or several implants. If your dentist has started to discuss the implants with you, then you may know that implants are created in several parts. The abutment is one of these parts, and you may be wondering if this piece is essential. Well, an abutment is sometimes not added to the implant. Keep reading to learn when this happens and why it may be helpful to you. 

When Can The Abutment Be Skipped?

Traditional dental implants are made from the implant root, the abutment, and the dental crown. In most cases, the abutment serves as the cap that protects the top of the implant root. It also serves as the attachment point for the dental crown. Basically, crowns are cemented over abutments. The abutment is then screwed to the top of the implant root. 

Your dentist may decide that the abutment is not right for your implant. Something called a healing cap will be placed over the top of the implant root instead while you heal. This cap is a short, smooth, and wide fitting that screws onto the top of the root, much like the abutment does. 

When the implant root is ready for the artificial tooth, the cap is removed and the artificial tooth is placed over the top of the root. This crown will be one with a hole in the middle. A screw will be secured through the hole and down into the top of the root. The screw will be recessed in the crown and this allows a dentist to create a resin cap that covers the metal screw. The result is a natural looking tooth.

How Can This Benefit You?

Dental implants that are created with abutments require the crown to be cemented to the abutment. The abutment then must be screwed to dental root. This produces two separate spots where the tooth can loosen. It can loosen from the cement holding the tooth to the abutment and the abutment itself can unscrew and create a loose implant. 

If a screw is inserted through the tooth, then only the screw has the option of loosening. This makes it more likely that the tooth will remain firm and secured once you start eating and biting normally. 

The screw adhered crown can also make your implant appear more aesthetically pleasing. Sometimes abutments can show a bit underneath the gum tissues. This can make your tooth look as though it has decayed. This is not a problem if the abutment is not added.